Local News | June 10, 2022

Expectant Moms Have Group Option for Prenatal Care

JOINT BASE SAN ANTONIO, Texas (June 2, 2022) – The San Antonio Market offers a group obstetric model for pregnant women at Brooke Army Medical Center.

Once a woman finds out she is pregnant, she has the option to choose traditional individual prenatal care or join a pregnancy group for prenatal care.

The group, led by a nurse midwife or nurse practitioner, consists of up to 12 expectant mothers who are around the same gestational period in their pregnancy. If a patient chooses the group OB option, they receive a welcome letter with all the scheduled dates for the group sessions. Each session is a two-hour appointment.

The first 30 minutes of the appointment is devoted to tummy time, which is done individually behind a screen for privacy. The women are able to take their own vitals, weight and blood pressure.

“This empowers women to take control of their pregnancy,” said U.S. Air Force Col. Veronica Gonzalez, chair, Department of Gynecologic Surgery and Obstetrics.

The remainder of the session is devoted to talking about educational topics, exercise and sharing information within the group. The group dynamic is relaxed. The women sit in a circle in oversized rocking chairs and usually bring snacks to share.

“The group is a very comfortable atmosphere,” said Christy Jackson, certified nurse midwife. “It’s not a lecture, it’s like being in a coffee shop with your girlfriends.”

According to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, group prenatal care models are designed to improve patient education and include opportunities for social support while maintaining the risk screening and physical assessment of individual prenatal care.

“I think it’s one of the best methodologies for prenatal care,” Jackson said. “We have statistical proof that there are better outcomes for women who center including a 33 percent reduction in preterm birth, a significant reduction in low birth weight, fewer cesarean deliveries and increased breastfeeding rates.”

Rachel Imman is 38 weeks along in her pregnancy with her first child.

“I have enjoyed the pregnancy group, especially because we are military,” Imman said. “I didn’t have as many friends because of COVID. It’s nice to have a bunch of ladies who are in the same boat that I am and we can actually talk to each other, ask questions and see what’s going on with each other. It makes me feel better. I don’t feel as isolated.”

First time mom Jessica Garrett agrees.

“I have really loved to be able to talk to other moms, especially because there’s second-time and third-time moms in the group,” Garrett said. “Getting advice from people who have had kids and been through it has been really helpful.”

Both Jackson and Gonzalez agree that group prenatal care is especially beneficial for the military population.

“I’ve really been able to see how much military women enjoy the group model because their spouses may be deployed and they are away from their support system,” Jackson said. “This group automatically becomes a stable relationship for them. They are able to create bonds and have someone to go through their pregnancy journey with. They also develop a close provider-patient relationship.”

“Another benefit to having group OB care in a military location is that all of their care is here,” Gonzalez said. “So, even if they have a complication, we can still see them in between their regular group appointments.”

Many of the pregnancy group members maintain contact outside the group via texting and social media.

“It’s like an instant support group for families who don’t have their families nearby,” Gonzalez said.
Ask the Doctor

Ask the Doc: Heat Stroke vs. Heat Exhaustion -- ...

Local News
Jun. 27, 2022

Dear Doc: During a recent run in the hot weather, I started to feel dizzy and got a headache. Could this be...
Read More
U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Rocio Romo, public affairs specialist at Space Launch Delta 30, spends quality time with her son at Cocheo Park on Vandenberg Space Force Base, California. We celebrate Month of the Military Child in April to celebrate military children whose parents serve the United States. (Photo: U.S. Space Force Airman 1st Class Kadielle Shaw)

Tips for Talking to Your Kids About Current Events

Local News
May. 26, 2022

ilitary families have a unique connection to war, regardless of when or where it occurs.For military children...
Read More
Army Lt. Col (Dr.) Robert Cornfeld explains how MHS Video Connect's convenient, secure, and easy-to-use virtual video visit capability helps providers keep patients on mission and improves engagement with them, directly leading to better health outcomes.

How MHS Video Connect Improves Mission Effective...

Local News
May. 19, 2022

MHS Video Connect, the Defense Health Agency's new comprehensive telehealth platform, puts Military Health...
Read More
Every May is Mental Health Month. If you know someone in crisis, contact the Military Crisis Line: 800-273-8255. (Photo: MHS Communications)

Together for Mental Health: May is Mental Health...

Local News
May. 16, 2022

Health is wealth, especially when dealing with mental well-being. Growing up, kids are taught if they are hurt...
Read More
COVID-19 Booster Effectiveness Remained High During Omicron Surge

COVID-19 Booster Effectiveness Remained High Dur...

Local News
Apr. 20, 2022

Active-duty service members who received a COVID-19 vaccine booster shot were significantly less likely to be...
Read More
RevX upgrades MHS GENESIS at Puget Sound Military Health System

RevX upgrades MHS GENESIS at Puget Sound Militar...

Local News
Apr. 18, 2022

The Department of Defense integrated electronic health record MHS GENESIS is being upgraded at Puget Sound...
Read More
U.S. Air Force Major Rachael Parrish, 20th Dental Squadron general dentist, performs an oral exam on Airman 1st Class Amie Bickford, 20th Equipment Maintenance Squadron munitions technician at Shaw Air Force Base, South Carolina, March 13, 2017. Airmen assigned to the 20th DS are tasked with ensuring airmen and soldiers on base meet all dental class requirements for deployment (Airman 1st Class Christopher Maldonado, 20th Fighter Wing Public Affairs).

Why Dental Health is Essential for Warfighters a...

Local News
Feb. 09, 2022

To help service members understand the importance of healthy teeth, some dentists use military-style...
Read More
Discussing the Strategic Way Forward

Tidewater Market Leaders Meet to Discuss Strateg...

Local News
Feb. 03, 2022

Military and civilian leaders of the Defense Health Agency’s Tidewater Market gathered, in accordance with...
Read More

Local News

 

 

Local News | June 10, 2022

Expectant Moms Have Group Option for Prenatal Care

JOINT BASE SAN ANTONIO, Texas (June 2, 2022) – The San Antonio Market offers a group obstetric model for pregnant women at Brooke Army Medical Center.

Once a woman finds out she is pregnant, she has the option to choose traditional individual prenatal care or join a pregnancy group for prenatal care.

The group, led by a nurse midwife or nurse practitioner, consists of up to 12 expectant mothers who are around the same gestational period in their pregnancy. If a patient chooses the group OB option, they receive a welcome letter with all the scheduled dates for the group sessions. Each session is a two-hour appointment.

The first 30 minutes of the appointment is devoted to tummy time, which is done individually behind a screen for privacy. The women are able to take their own vitals, weight and blood pressure.

“This empowers women to take control of their pregnancy,” said U.S. Air Force Col. Veronica Gonzalez, chair, Department of Gynecologic Surgery and Obstetrics.

The remainder of the session is devoted to talking about educational topics, exercise and sharing information within the group. The group dynamic is relaxed. The women sit in a circle in oversized rocking chairs and usually bring snacks to share.

“The group is a very comfortable atmosphere,” said Christy Jackson, certified nurse midwife. “It’s not a lecture, it’s like being in a coffee shop with your girlfriends.”

According to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, group prenatal care models are designed to improve patient education and include opportunities for social support while maintaining the risk screening and physical assessment of individual prenatal care.

“I think it’s one of the best methodologies for prenatal care,” Jackson said. “We have statistical proof that there are better outcomes for women who center including a 33 percent reduction in preterm birth, a significant reduction in low birth weight, fewer cesarean deliveries and increased breastfeeding rates.”

Rachel Imman is 38 weeks along in her pregnancy with her first child.

“I have enjoyed the pregnancy group, especially because we are military,” Imman said. “I didn’t have as many friends because of COVID. It’s nice to have a bunch of ladies who are in the same boat that I am and we can actually talk to each other, ask questions and see what’s going on with each other. It makes me feel better. I don’t feel as isolated.”

First time mom Jessica Garrett agrees.

“I have really loved to be able to talk to other moms, especially because there’s second-time and third-time moms in the group,” Garrett said. “Getting advice from people who have had kids and been through it has been really helpful.”

Both Jackson and Gonzalez agree that group prenatal care is especially beneficial for the military population.

“I’ve really been able to see how much military women enjoy the group model because their spouses may be deployed and they are away from their support system,” Jackson said. “This group automatically becomes a stable relationship for them. They are able to create bonds and have someone to go through their pregnancy journey with. They also develop a close provider-patient relationship.”

“Another benefit to having group OB care in a military location is that all of their care is here,” Gonzalez said. “So, even if they have a complication, we can still see them in between their regular group appointments.”

Many of the pregnancy group members maintain contact outside the group via texting and social media.

“It’s like an instant support group for families who don’t have their families nearby,” Gonzalez said.
Learn More about COVID-19 and the COVID-19 Vaccine.