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Image of two Airmen treating a patient.

Air Force SMART program sustains readiness and c...

Local News
Oct. 27, 2022

The Air Force’s Sustained Medical and Readiness Trained, or SMART, program has become a dynamic training...
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JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (Sept. 24, 2022) – Capt. Sharon House, Naval Hospital Jacksonville director and Navy Medicine Readiness and Training Command Jacksonville commander, together with the command’s Military Health System (MHS) GENESIS team, prepare to cut the ceremonial ribbon for the new electronic health record system MHS GENESIS on September 24 at the hospital. The ribbon cutting recognized the launch of the new electronic health record at the hospital and its Naval Branch Health Clinics Jacksonville, Key West and Mayport. (U.S. Navy photo by Yan Kennon, Naval Hospital Jacksonville/Released).

MHS GENESIS ‘Goes Live’ at Naval Hospital Jackso...

Local News
Sep. 26, 2022

Naval Hospital (NH) Jacksonville and Naval Branch Health Clinics (NBHC) Jacksonville, Key West and Mayport...
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Novavax COVID-19 Vaccine Now Available for 12 to 17 Year-Olds

Novavax COVID-19 Vaccine Now Available for 12 to...

Local News
Aug. 31, 2022

Adolescents ages 12 to 17 can now receive the Novavax COVID-19 vaccine, the fourth vaccine to be authorized...
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New COVID-19 Boosters Against Subvariants Coming Soon

New COVID-19 Boosters Against Subvariants Coming...

Local News
Aug. 30, 2022

Public health experts say COVID-19 cases are anticipated to spike again this fall, but new vaccine versions...
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Image of monkeypox.

Eligible Airmen, Guardians have access to more m...

Local News
Aug. 22, 2022

The Department of Defense is increasing its supply of the approved monkeypox vaccine, JYNNEOS, which allows...
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JBSA-Lackland, JBSA-Randolph Pharmacies change processes

JBSA-Lackland, JBSA-Randolph pharmacies implemen...

Local News
Aug. 19, 2022

The Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland and Randolph Pharmacy teams are changing some of their processes to...
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collage of active duty service women

After Dobbs Decision, Department of Defense Prov...

Local News
Aug. 16, 2022

When the U.S. Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, the 1973 decision protecting abortion rights, service...
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Walk-in clinic aids service members with musculoskeletal injuries

Walk-in clinic aids service members with musculo...

Local News
Aug. 16, 2022

The Brooke Army Medical Center Musculoskeletal Integrated Practice Unit, located in the Capt. Jennifer M...
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Local News | June 24, 2021

PTSD, What You Should Know

By 1st. Lt. Paige Skinner

According to the National Center for PTSD-Department of Veterans Affairs, PTSD is a mental health issue that one may develop after witnessing or experiencing a life-threatening event such as a natural disaster, combat, sexual assault, or car accident. They also specify that anyone can develop PTSD and at any time in their life after a traumatic event. 

"Anyone can suffer from PTSD. It doesn't pick and choose," said Maj. Kimberly McKenna, 633rd Medical Group Family Advocacy officer. "If a traumatic event has happened to you and you notice or your loved ones notice your behavior has changed, that's a sign [of PTSD]."

The National Center for PTSD-Department of Veterans Affairs takes the entire month of June to raise awareness of treatment options, dispel myths and explain how to receive proper care.

McKenna stated some signs of PTSD are behaviors such as consuming alcohol more often, using drugs, increased anger or irritability and engaging in risky behavior without regard to personal safety. 

"We have been in a war for a while, and the VA has seen an increase in diagnoses of PTSD. We want to get the awareness out there so that people are more comfortable with seeking help and understand they are not alone," McKenna said. 

McKenna recommends putting the National Suicide Hotline number into your phone contacts so you are always ready with at least one resource if you come across someone in need. 

Some members may be concerned about seeking help for PTSD due to the nature of their work.

"This is not a horrible disease that you should be ashamed of or hide,” McKenna explained. “It is real, there is treatment for it and with support you can have a better outcome than if you don't seek treatment," She continued, "This is a psychological injury that deserves to be taken care of and that’s okay to acknowledge."  

If you or someone you know is suffering from PTSD or similar symptoms, speak with your primary care provider to discuss treatment and medication options. The mental health clinic, Military OneSource and Military Family Life Counselors also offer a variety of therapy opportunities.
 
  • Military OneSource/MFLAC: 800-342-9647
  • National Suicide Prevention Line: 800-273-8255

Local News

 

 

Local News | June 24, 2021

PTSD, What You Should Know

By 1st. Lt. Paige Skinner

According to the National Center for PTSD-Department of Veterans Affairs, PTSD is a mental health issue that one may develop after witnessing or experiencing a life-threatening event such as a natural disaster, combat, sexual assault, or car accident. They also specify that anyone can develop PTSD and at any time in their life after a traumatic event. 

"Anyone can suffer from PTSD. It doesn't pick and choose," said Maj. Kimberly McKenna, 633rd Medical Group Family Advocacy officer. "If a traumatic event has happened to you and you notice or your loved ones notice your behavior has changed, that's a sign [of PTSD]."

The National Center for PTSD-Department of Veterans Affairs takes the entire month of June to raise awareness of treatment options, dispel myths and explain how to receive proper care.

McKenna stated some signs of PTSD are behaviors such as consuming alcohol more often, using drugs, increased anger or irritability and engaging in risky behavior without regard to personal safety. 

"We have been in a war for a while, and the VA has seen an increase in diagnoses of PTSD. We want to get the awareness out there so that people are more comfortable with seeking help and understand they are not alone," McKenna said. 

McKenna recommends putting the National Suicide Hotline number into your phone contacts so you are always ready with at least one resource if you come across someone in need. 

Some members may be concerned about seeking help for PTSD due to the nature of their work.

"This is not a horrible disease that you should be ashamed of or hide,” McKenna explained. “It is real, there is treatment for it and with support you can have a better outcome than if you don't seek treatment," She continued, "This is a psychological injury that deserves to be taken care of and that’s okay to acknowledge."  

If you or someone you know is suffering from PTSD or similar symptoms, speak with your primary care provider to discuss treatment and medication options. The mental health clinic, Military OneSource and Military Family Life Counselors also offer a variety of therapy opportunities.
 
  • Military OneSource/MFLAC: 800-342-9647
  • National Suicide Prevention Line: 800-273-8255
Learn More about COVID-19 and the COVID-19 Vaccine.